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More than 40 speakers from 16 countries and modern history makers are taking part in IGCF

· Event is expected to welcome around 3,000 experts, government officials and media and communication professionals

Sharjah, United Arab Emirates, March 28, 2018, (AETOSWire): Sean Spicer, former Whitehouse Press Secretary (2017), Nobel Peace Laureate Lech Walesa, former Polish President who played a leading role in the fall of communism in the Eastern Bloc, Sir Timothy Berners-Lee, inventor of the World Wide Web and Jimmy Wales, founder of Wikipedia are among the many modern history makers speaking at Sharjah’s International Government Communication Forum that opened Wednesday (March 28).

Held with the support of His Highness Sheikh Dr Sultan bin Mohamed Al Qasimi, Supreme Council Member and Ruler of Sharjah, the event is being hosted by the International Government Communication Centre (IGCC), a subsidiary of the Sharjah Government Media Bureau, from March 28-29 at Expo Centre Sharjah.

The 7th edition of the IGCF, being held under the theme ‘Digital Millennium… Where To?, is expected to welcome more than 3,000 communication experts, decision makers, government officials, government communication professionals, civil society organisations media personnel and students of communication and journalism.

Around 40 speakers from 16 countries, including global industry influencers and international policy advisors are taking part in the Forum, presenting sessions on subjects as diverse as ‘Digital Diplomacy in Government Communication’, ‘Media Charisma’ and ‘New Media in Serving Humanitarian Issues’.

The event features 18 panel discussions and inspiring sessions, 6 interactive talks, 4 brainstorming sessions for children and young adults and 7 workshops for journalists, government communication experts and visitors to the Forum.

 Launched in 2012 under the directives of His Highness Sheikh Dr Sultan bin Mohamed Al Qasimi, Supreme Council Member and Ruler of Sharjah, the event aims to highlight best practices to achieve more efficient and effective communication between the government and the public – a field in which the Emirate of Sharjah has played a leading regional role in terms of digital integration and smart government.

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Contacts:

Hussain Almulla, Media Relation Executive, +971563980067 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Jeddah — A significant number of expatriate families is preparing to leave the Kingdom in the coming weeks after the end of final examinations of their children.

Final exams in many community schools are ending in March and the school year in private schools is ending in May-June.

For most children, born and brought up in the Kingdom, saying goodbye to the country they consider their home is a tough call.

It is psychologically and emotionally draining for these children who are often found discussing among themselves the trauma of leaving Saudi Arabia.

“Nearly half of my class friends are saying that they will leave after the exams,” said Areeba Ahmed, an Indian student of grade 3 in a local school.

The imposition of dependent’s fee is the prime reason for most families to leave the Kingdom for good.

Private and community schools in the Kingdom are set to witness an exodus of students after the examinations.

“In some classes more than half of the pupils have informed that they are leaving the Kingdom,” said an official of a leading school in Jeddah.

Some schools are asking parents about the number of children who will continue classes and how many wish to leave.

“We are required to ascertain the strength of students for logistical reasons,” said a source in another leading school which is paying a huge rent for its premises.

The shrinking enrolment and increase in operational cost is impacting the very existence of many private schools.

Some schools are demanding a lump sum amount instead of monthly fee while others are offering incentives to stop children from quitting the school.

The enforcement of new building rules and the increased Ajeer fee are other factors that have affected many private schools.

“I have spent a wonderful time with my family in Kingdom. It is now time to send them back as I am not able to bear the dependent’s fee,” said Mohammed Nazeer, an Indian hailing from Hyderabad in Telangana.

THANK heavens Theresa May gave a warm welcome to the illustrious Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia, His Royal Majesty Mohammad bin Salman. For it is meet and right that she should do so. His Royal Highness is a courageous Arab reformer, keen to drag his wealthy nation into the 21st century in a raft of promises — women’s rights, massive economic restructuring, moderate Islam, further intelligence gathering on behalf of the West and an even more vital alliance in the “War on Terror”.

Thank God, however, that Theresa May — in her infinite wisdom — is not going to waste her time greeting an aggressive Arab crown prince whose outrageous war in Yemen is costing thousands of lives and tainting the United Kingdom with his shame by purchasing millions of dollars in weapons from May to use against the people of Yemen, who is trying to destroy his wealthy Arab brothers in Qatar and doing his best to persuade the US, Britain and sundry other Westerners to join the Saudi war against the Shias of the Middle East.

You see the problem? When it comes to money, guns and power, we will cuddle up to any Arab autocrat, especially if our masters in Washington, however insane, feel the same way about him — and it will always be a “him”, won’t it? And we will wash our hands with them if or when they have ceased to be of use, or no longer buy our weapons or run out of cash or simply get overthrown. Thus I can feel some sympathy for young Mohammad.

I have to add — simply in terms of human rights — that anyone who has to listen to Theresa ‘Let’s Get On With It’ May for more than a few minutes has my profound sympathy. The Saudi foreign minister, Adel al-Jubeir, must surely feel the same impatience when he listens to the patently dishonest ramblings of his opposite number. Boris Johnson’s contempt and then love for the Balfour Declaration in the space of less than 12 months is recognised in the Arab world as the cynical charade that it is.

 

Human rights groups, Amnesty and the rest are angrily calling Crown Prince Mohammad to account this week. So are the inevitable protesters. Any constable who raises a baton to keep order will be “doing the Saudis’ work”, we can be sure. But I fear that the crown prince should be far more concerned by the government which is now grovelling to his leadership. For he is dealing with a Western power, in this case the Brits. And the only advice he should be given in such circumstances is: mind your back.

A walk, now, down memory lane. When Qadhafi overthrew King Idris, the Foreign Office smiled upon him. A fresh face, a safe pair of hands with an oil-bearing nation whose wealth we might consume, we thought Qadhafi might be our man. The Americans even tipped him off about a counter-coup, just as we much later helped Qadhafi round up his opponents for torture. Then he decided to be an anti-colonial nationalist and eventually got mixed up with the IRA and a bomb in a West Berlin nightclub — and bingo, he became a super-terrorist. Yet come the “War on Terror” and the invasion of Iraq, Qadhafi was kissed by the venerable Blair and became a super-statesman again. Until the 2011 revolution, at which point he had to become a super-terrorist once more, bombed by Nato and murdered by his own people.

Talking of Iraq, Saddam had a similar experience. At first we rather liked the chap and the Americans even tipped him off on the location of his communist opponents. He was a head-chopper, to be sure, but as long as he invaded the right country, he was a super-statesman. Hence we helped him in his invasion of Iran in 1980 but declared him a super-terrorist in 1990 when he invaded the wrong country: Kuwait. And he ended up, like Qadhafi, killed by his own people, albeit that the Americans set up the court which decided to hang him.

Yasser Arafat — not that we even think of him these days — was a Palestinian super-terrorist in Beirut. He was the centre of world terror until he shook hands with Yitzhak Rabin and Bill Clinton, at which point he became a super-statesman. But the moment he refused to deviate from the Oslo agreement and accept Israeli hegemony over the West Bank — he was never offered “90 per cent” of it, as the American media claimed — he was on the way to super-terrorism again. Surrounded and bombarded in his Ramallah hovel, he was airlifted to a Paris military hospital where he conveniently died. The Israelis had already dubbed him “our bin Laden”, a title they later tried to confer on Arafat’s luckless successor Mahmoud Abbas — who was neither a super-terrorist nor a super-statesman but something worse: a failure.

It should not be necessary to run through the other Arab transmogrification from evil to good to evil again. Nasser, who helped to overthrow the corrupt King Farouk, quickly became a super-terrorist when he nationalised the Suez Canal and was called the “Mussolini of the Nile” by Eden — a slightly measly comparison when you remember that Saddam became the “Hitler of the Tigris” in 1990.

Khomeini was a potential super-statesman in his Paris exile when the Shah was overthrown. Then he became a super-terrorist-in-chief once he established the Islamic Republic. The French Jacobins thought that Hafez al-Assad was a potential super-statesman but decided he was a super-terrorist when Bashar al-Assad — lionised in France after his father’s death — went to war on his opponents, thus becoming a super-terrorist himself. The Brits quickly shrugged off their loyalties to Omani and Qatari emirs when their sons staged coups against them.

Thus Mohammad bin Salman might be reminded by Adel al-Jubeir as he settles down in London: “Memento homo”, the gladiator’s reminder to every emperor that he is only “a man”. What if the Yemen war is even bloodier, what if the Saudi military become increasingly disenchanted with the war — which is almost certainly why the crown prince staged a putsch among his commanders last month — and what if his Vision 2030 proves a Saudi South Sea Bubble? What if the humiliated and vexatious princes and billionaires he humbled in the Riyadh Ritz Hotel come to take their revenge? What if — dare one speak his name? — a future British prime minister reopened the Special Branch enquiry into the Al-Yamamah arms contract? And, while we’re on the subject, what if someone discovers the routes by which US weapons reached the militant Islamic State group and their chums after 2014?

Or a real war breaks out with Iran? Please note, no mention here of the Sunni-Shia struggle, the 2016 killing of Shia opponents in Saudi Arabia — most described as “terrorists”, most of them decapitated — and absolutely no reference to the fact that Saudi Arabia’s Wahhabist doctrines are the very inspiration of IS and Al Qaeda and all the other jihadi mumbo-jumbo cults that have devastated the Middle East.

Nope. The truth is, you can’t just tell who your friends are these days. Wasn’t it the Brits who double-crossed the Saudi monarchy’s predecessors in Arabia by promising them an Arab empire but grabbing Palestine and Transjordan and Iraq for themselves? Wasn’t it the Brits who published the Balfour Declaration and then tried to betray the Jews to whom they’d promised a homeland and the Arabs whose lands they had promised to protect? Wasn’t it — since we are talking autocrats — the Brits who gave Ceausescu an honorary knighthood and then took it back when he was deposed? We gave Mugabe the same gong and then took it back. Incredibly, we gave one to Mussolini too. Yes, we took it back in 1940.

So have a care, Crown Prince Mohammad. Don’t trust perfidious Albion. Watch your back at home, but also abroad. Thanks for all the arms purchases. And thanks for all the intelligence bumph to help us keep track of the lads who are brainwashed with the Wahabi faith which you abide by. But don’t — whatever you do — be tempted by an honorary knighthood.

—By arrangement with The Independent

Published in Dawn, March 10th, 2018

NEW DELHI: India and Iran on Saturday signed agreements, including Tehran leasing to New Delhi operational control of part of the Iranian east coast port of Chabahar for 18 months.

The $85 million project, just 90km from Gwadar port, creates a transit route between India, Iran and Afghanistan, bypassing Pakistan.

India is trying to develop Chabahar as a way to gain access to the markets of Central Asia countries as well as Afghanistan.

New Delhi, Tehran sign agreements; Modi, Rouhani discuss peace in Afghanistan

But progress is slow because of concern that President Donald Trump’s administration in Washington may eventually scrap the Iran nuclear deal.

A leasing agreement giving operational control to India of Shahid Beheshti port — phase one of the Chabahar port — was signed in the presence of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani.

Later, addressing a joint press conference with the Iranian president, Mr Modi said both countries wanted to expand bilateral ties and cooperation in economic development.

“We will support the construction of the Chabahar-Zahedan rail link so that Chabahar gateway’s potential could be fully utilised,” he said. “We want to expand connectivity, cooperation in the energy sector and the centuries-old bilateral relationship.”

Other agreements included a double taxation avoidance treaty, extradition, and cooperation in the farm sector.

Mr Rouhani, who arrived in the southern city of Hyderabad on Thurs­day, will later address industrialists.

Peace in Afghanistan

The Indian prime minister and the Iranian president agreed to step up efforts to bring stability to war-ravaged Afghanistan.

Mr Modi reiterated India’s commitment to help Afghanistan become “a peaceful, secure, permanent, prosperous and pluralistic country” after holding talks with Mr Rouhani in New Delhi on the last day of his three-day visit.

“Looking at our common interests, we are committed to stopping the expansion of such forces that promote international organised crime in terrorism, extremism, illegal drug trafficking, cyber crime and various forms,” Mr Modi said.

“We want to see our region and the world free from terrorism,” he added.

There was no mention of financial assistance or providing weapons to help Afghanistan fight militants by either leader. They did not name Pakistan.

India has been a key supporter of Kabul’s government and has poured more than $2 billion into the country since the Taliban were toppled in 2001.

India has been a key purchaser of Iranian oil and gas, and maintained trade ties even as international sanctions were imposed on Tehran over its nuclear programme between 2012 and 2016. However, local Indian media have reported frustrations over delays in awarding a contract to develop a major gas field known as Farzad B in the Gulf.

India’s foreign ministry said on Saturday that “discussions continue” on Farzad B.

Published in Dawn, February 18th, 2018

MANILA, Feb 12: The Philippines Monday expanded a ban on its citizens working in Kuwait after President Rodrigo Duterte angrily lashed out at the Gulf state over reports of Filipino workers suffering abuse and exploitation. Authorities say 252,000 Filipinos work in Kuwait, many as maids.

They are among over two million employed in the region, whose remittances are a lifeline to the Philippine economy. But Labour Secretary Silvestre Bello Monday announced a “total ban” on new employment in the country, including Filipinos who had already obtained employment permits but had not yet left for the wealthy oil-producing country. Authorities have not ruled out revoking the permits of Filipinos currently working in Kuwait or of previous hires returning on new contracts.

“With the advent of the series of reports involving abuses and deaths of overseas Filipino workers in Kuwait, a total ban on deployment of all overseas workers … is hereby enforced,” Bello said, reading an order.

“This order takes effect immediately.” The move would affect thousands of workers, labour spokeswoman Abegail de Vega said. The fresh move came after Duterte last month barred Filipinos from seeking work in Kuwait, although the ban exempted those who had already secured permission. Last Friday Duterte hit out at Kuwait as he brandished photos reportedly of a Filipina maid found in a freezer, saying she had been “roasted like a pig”.

Duterte has been vocal on the issue of abuse of Filipinos in the Middle East, even threatening a ban on citizens working anywhere in the region. He also alleged Arab employers routinely raped their Filipina workers, forced them to work 21 hours each day and fed them scraps. “Is there something wrong with your culture? Is there something wrong with your values?” he had said, addressing Kuwait.

Kuwait’s embassy in Manila declined to comment. Accounts of Filipinos being subjected to abuse, overwork, rape or dying in suspicious circumstances in the region have long circulated. The Philippine foreign affairs department said Monday authorities were repatriating 10,000 overstaying Filipinos from Kuwait, taking advantage of an amnesty programme arranged with the Kuwaiti government. Officials added they were eyeing China and Russia as “alternative markets” for overseas workers.

Mixed reactions
The total ban has, meanwhile, generated varied reactions from OFWs in Kuwait. One of those who were happy of the total deployment ban was Remy, the neighbour of Joanna Daniela Demafelis, the Filipina household service worker whose body was found inside the freezer. “I fully support the total ban. I don’t encourage Filipinos to come here to work as housemaid. What if they end up with barbaric employers like the employers of Joanna,” stated Remy.

Others were saddened upon reading the news on the social media. “Not all Kuwaitis are bad. My employer has been very good to me. I had cancer and my employer took care of my treatment till I got well. I’ve been receiving my salary continuously and they are all supported me. It should have been case to case basis,” pointed out Terzery who works at a Kuwaiti household.

Meanwhile, Filipino skilled workers or those who are under visa 18 were taken by surprise of the total deployment ban. “Why include us? We have good jobs here. My husband is working here and our two kids are studying here. Skilled workers are okay. Yes, we all know that household service workers are vulnerable to abuses. If we go home now, can they give us a good job? Do they have any concrete plan for all the affected skilled workers?” lamented Mildred Lacson.

Other Filipino organisations and OFW advocates also aired their dismay on the brazen decision of the government. “The skilled workers should have not been included. We enjoy full protection under the Kuwait Labour Law plus there’s already an existing Memorandum of Understanding on Labour Cooperation for skilled workers signed by Kuwait and the Philippines in 2012. Our government should look into this,” appealed Ana Del Mundo, the founder and Vice-Chair of the Philippine Society of Marketing Specialists in Kuwait. “We are dismayed and saddened of this development. We hope Secretary Bello reconsider his decision of including the skilled workers in the total ban though we understand and fully support our government’s stance in protecting all Filipino workers in Kuwait,” stated Dr Chie Umandap, the founder of Ako OFW in Kuwait, an OFW advocacy group.

Meanwhile, Philippine Ambassador to Kuwait Renato Pedro Villa advised all Filipino nationals who have valid visas and enjoy good working condition to stay put and postpone all vacation plans. “We are advising them not to go home now for they cannot come back because of the total deployment ban. Those who are vacationing now in the Philippines cannot come back for now because of the total ban till further notice,” explained Villa. Along the same line, some companies in Kuwait with a huge number of Filipino employees issued circular asking them to postpone their leave. Some airline companies have also informed their Filipino cabin crew that they will not be included in the roster of flights to Manila until further notice due to the ban.

Meanwhile, the repatriation of undocumented OFWs continues with the second batch composed of 300 repatriates flew to Manila on Tuesday night. There are around 10,000 undocumented Filipino workers in Kuwait based on the records of the Ministry of Interior and the embassy is targeting to repatriate at least 7,000 undocumented OFWs. The Ministry of Interior has already issued more than 2,000 exit clearances to those who applied for amnesty.

Shocking statements 
A group of Filipino workers returning from Kuwait to their country made shocking statements to the Philippine People’s Television correspondent claiming that they had been subjected to coercive conditions during their stay and work in Kuwait, reports Al-Anba daily.

Although most of these workers left Kuwait for the Philippines, taking advantage of the amnesty issued by the Kuwaiti Ministry of Interior, many of them used Duterte’s statements to ban travel of workers to Kuwait and to allow them to return to their country at the expense of the state and provide them with financial assistance. In televised statements one of the Filipinas said she worked in Kuwait as a maid for only nine months. “The employer used to hit me and hit my head against the wall and I reached a point where I could not take it anymore.”

“They treated me like an animal and they threw food at me. They would not even call me by my name,” said another Filipina. Yet another Filipina, identified only as Fatima said: “I worked for 5 years in Kuwait, and the result was they put me in jail for two years after accusing me of stealing.” After interviewing a group of workers, the TV correspondent commented saying there are still some 7,000 Filipino workers in Kuwait and added her government plans to return them to the Philippines.

Meanwhile, one of the Philippine senators has asked the Philippine embassy in Kuwait and the ministries of Foreign Affairs, Labor and Employment in his country to take responsibility for ensuring the safety of Filipino workers in Kuwait. However, it is largely believed there is no iota of truth in what has been mentioned by the Filipino domestic workers after arriving in their country.

Employers ID’d
Authorities have identified the employers of Joanna Daniela Demafelis, the Filipina household worker whose body was found in a freezer, as Lebanese Nader Issam Assaf and his Syrian wife Mona Hassoun. Al Arabiya English said in a report published on its website Monday that the Interpol is now looking for the employers of Demafelis. It has been reported that the couple and their two children left the country in November 2016, while the body of Demafelis was discovered recently when the owner of the apartment obtained permission from the court to enter the apartment.

Initially, the officers tasked to investigate the case thought the suspects were staying in Lebanon but a report published by Al-Rai daily disclosed they are in Syria. The daily also revealed that Assaf filed a missing report on Demafelis two days before leaving the country. Assaf reportedly grew up in his paternal aunt’s house in Beirut. His relatives think he is being controlled by his wife, indicating he cannot even smoke in front of her. Assaf’s aunt told Al-Rai daily that she raised him after his father left his mother. “It’s impossible. My nephew would never kill anyone,” she stressed. “The last time we saw him was around two years ago when he came for his father’s funeral. He then returned to Kuwait and we later learnt that he went to Syria,” she added. “Maybe his wife is behind the crime. She is edgy and he always feared her. He once let her kick his mother from their house in Kuwait,” Assaf’s cousin said. His relatives added that Assaf’s mother once visited him in Syria and when she returned she told them that he looked “mentally unstable.”

Meanwhile, Filipino officials continue to comment on the decision of Duterte to stop sending workers to Kuwait. Manila Bulletin published a report on its website Monday quoting Senator Ralph Recto as saying that the government must provide “prompt care” for Filipino workers returning from Kuwait. He stressed the need for the government to help Filipinos working in Kuwait, taking into consideration the value of their remittances. In a press statement, Recto said these workers are not sending small amount to the country such that their remittances “help keep the economy afloat.” He cited as an example the remittances of Filipinos working in Kuwait last year which reached P40.6 billion. He added this amount exceeds the earnings of large companies in the Philippines; pointing out that if these Filipino workers were a company, they would have been ranked as the 37th biggest in the country. He went on to say, “This financial contribution to their homeland makes them deserving of government care, whether repatriation or legal help if they are still there, and employment and livelihood assistance once they are home for good.”

Moreover, globalnation.inquirer.net has quoted Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) Secretary Alan Peter Cayetano as saying, “Our efforts to protect our fellow citizens will not end with the imposition of deployment bans or the repatriation of our workers in countries where they are prone to maltreatment. We will also go after illegal recruiters, human traffickers and other modern-day slave traders who continue to victimize our people.” — english.alarabiya.net, news. mb.com.ph and globalnation.inquirer. net

 

By Michelle Fe Santiago Arab Times Staff and Agencies

DUBAI: Gulf metropolis Dubai, on its never-ending quest to break records, announced the opening of the “world’s new tallest hotel” on Sunday, pipping another towering landmark in the city for the title.

The gleaming gold 75-storey Gevora Hotel stands 356 metres, or nearly a quarter of a mile, tall. The new record-holder is within view of its predecessor, Dubai’s JW Mariott Marquis — just one metre shorter.

The Gevora’s first guests are expected on Monday, according to Emirati daily The National. Dubai is also home to the world’s tallest building, the Burj Khalifa, which pierces the city skyline at 828 metres (half a mile) high.

The city-state, one of seven sheikhdoms that make up the energy-rich United Arab Emirates, aims to attract 20 million visitors annually by 2020 when it hosts the global trade fair Expo 2020.

The desert emirate boasts opulent shopping malls, numerous luxury resorts and even an indoor ski resort.

A major transit hub situated on transcontinental air routes, Dubai airport was the world’s busiest for international passengers in 2017 for the fourth year running, with 88.2 million travellers.

Published in Dawn, February 12th, 2018

Palestinian protest icon Ahed Tamimi is to go on trial before an Israeli military court on Tuesday for slapping and punching two Israeli soldiers an act Palestinians say embodies their David vs. Goliath struggle against a brutal military occupation and Israel portrays as a staged provocation meant to embarrass its military.

Israel's full-throttle prosecution of Tamimi, one of an estimated 300 Palestinian minors in Israeli jails, and a senior Israeli official's recent stunning revelation that he once had parliament investigate whether the blond, blue-eyed Tamimis are a “real” Palestinian family have helped stoke ongoing interest in the case.

The teen with the curly mane of hair who turned 17 in jail last month has become the latest symbol of the long-running battle between Palestinians and Israelis over global public opinion.

The case touches on what constitutes legitimate resistance to Israel's rule over millions of Palestinians, already in its 51st year after Israel captured the West Bank, Gaza Strip and east Jerusalem in 1967.

Ahed Tamimi's supporters see a brave girl who struck two armed soldiers outside her West Bank home in frustration after having just learned that Israeli troops seriously wounded a 15-year-old cousin, shooting him in the head from close range with a rubber bullet during nearby stone-throwing clashes.

Israel has treated Tamimi's actions as a criminal offence, indicting her on charges of assault and incitement that could potentially land her in prison for several years.

Tamimi's middle-of-the-night arrest from her home in December and her pre-trial court appearances, flanked by Israeli guards and looking impassive, have evoked a sense of history on a loop.

Another generation of Palestinians seems locked in a cycle of protests and arrests by Israel, three decades after Palestinians staged their first uprising, throwing stones and burning tires in the streets.

Since the mid-1990s, several US-mediated rounds of Israeli-Palestinian negotiations on setting up a Palestinian state alongside Israel have ended in failure.

Gaps in positions only widened in the past decade, as Israeli settlement expansion continued and the Palestinians failed to end a crippling political split between an internationally backed self-rule government in parts of the West Bank and the militant group Hamas which dominates Gaza.

Tamimi's father Bassem, who threw his first stone at the age of 14 and was an activist in the first uprising, said he expects the military court will deal harshly with his daughter and that she might remain in prison for some time.

His wife, Nariman, is being prosecuted in the same Dec. 15 scuffle in their village of Nabi Saleh and has been locked up alongside their daughter.

Since 2009, residents of Nabi Salah have staged regular anti-occupation protests that often ended with stone-throwing clashes.

Ahed Tamimi has participated in such marches from a young age, and has had several highly publicised run-ins with soldiers. One photo shows the then 12-year-old raising a clenched fist toward a soldier towering over her.

Despite the personal pain, the father said he is optimistic heading into the courtroom and that he believes he is witnessing progress.

He argues that his daughter's case and the outpouring of support for her more than 1.7 million people have already signed an online petition calling for her release signal the beginning of the final chapter of Israel's occupation.

“I see that we are starting the turning point in our history, to deal with our occupier and colonisation in a different way,” said Tamimi. “Yes, there is a price (to pay) ... but this generation Ahed represents will be the generation of freedom.”

Yaakov Amidror, a former national security adviser to Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, doesn't believe the trial will hurt Israel's image, saying that “those who are against Israel will be against it if she (Tamimi) is brought to court or if she is not.”

Amidror played down the findings of a recent Pew poll that indicated younger, liberal Americans are less supportive of Israel's narrative than older generations.

He portrayed young liberals as naive and said he expects their views to change as they get older, but added that Israel needs to work “very, very hard not to lose these people.”

In Nabi Saleh, Bassem Tamimi has used the interest in his daughter's case to generate more support, saying he has hosted hundreds of foreigners in his home since her Dec. 19 arrest. His living room is decorated with several “Free Ahed” posters and one of Nariman.

On a recent morning, he met with volunteer observers from Switzerland, Sweden, Colombia, Argentina and Britain, going over the details of Ahed's case and explaining his political views, including his support for a single, bi-national state in which Israelis and Palestinians enjoy equal rights.

The visitors, part of a program that typically has them touring the West Bank for three months, listened intently and jotted down some of what he said. “Your notes will be part of history in the near future,” he told them. “And we will put it in a museum.”

The visit ended with hugs, tears and a group photo on his porch, against the backdrop of Nabi Saleh, a village of about 600 members of the extended Tamimi clan.

After the group left, Bassem Tamimi got word that Hebrew graffiti had popped up on several walls in the village, but that teenagers were trying to cover up the threatening messages.

He rushed to the area, a few hundred meters (yards) from an army watchtower at the edge of the village, to try to preserve what he felt were valuable tools in the PR battle with Israel.

The first slogan called for the death penalty for Ahed. A second read: “The Tamimi family has no place in the Land of Israel.”

A third warned: “Greetings from the retaliation branch of the IDF.” As he took photos and video to be posted on social media, a dozen teenagers, some masked, headed toward the watchtower for weekly stone-throwing clashes with soldiers.

Worried that they might try to spray over the graffiti, Tamimi shouted, “Leave it, leave it,” as the group walked past him.

The boys began throwing stones toward a main road that separates Nabi Saleh from the Israeli settlement of Halamish, built in part on expropriated village land. Several soldiers arrived and fired stun grenades and rubber coated steel pellets.

From her second-floor balcony, Fattoum Tartier, a 41-year-old English teacher, kept an eye on her 11-year-old son, Hussein, in the street below to make sure he didn't join the clashes.

“I want my children to live a good life, like everyone else in other parts of the world,” she said, her words punctuated by the booms from stun grenades.

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